Best 3 design books I read

Draplin Design Co.: Pretty Much Everything

by Aaron James Draplin

At over 256 pages, it is certainly not a quick read, but that’s one of the things I liked most about it. Ford Motors. The Obama Administration. Burton Snowboards. While all of these brands are vastly different, they share at least one thing in common: Aaron Draplin. The man behind developing the aesthetic and identity of these brands, Aaron Draplin is one of the new school of influential graphic designers who combines the power of design, social media, entrepreneurship, and DIY aesthetic to create a successful business and way of life. Draplin Design Co. is a mid-career survey of work, case studies, inspiration, road stories, lists, maps, how-tos, and advice. It includes examples of his work–posters, record covers, logos–and presents the process behind his design with projects like Field Notes and the Things We Love “State” Posters. Draplin also offers valuable advice and hilarious commentary that illustrates how much more goes into design than just what appears on the page. With Draplin’s humour and pointed observations on the contemporary design scene, Draplin Design Co. is the complete package for the new generation of designers.

Lance Wyman: The Monograph

Ok, so this books look is the first major publication devoted to Lance Wyman’s entire output. It showcases the achievements of a long and productive career, from his early work for General Motors, through his iconic designs for the Mexico 68 Olympics, to the Minnesota Zoo and his more recent projects.

Logo: The Reference Guide to Symbols and Logotypes

(Mini) by Michael Evamy

The next time you are tempted to design a logo, take a look at this book. By raising the bar, this wonderful resource will make better designers of all of us.” The logo bible, this book provides graphic designers with an indispensable reference source for contemporary logo design. More than 1300 logos are grouped according to their focal form, symbol and graphic associations into 75 categories such as crosses, stars, crowns, animals, people, handwritten, illustrative type, etc. To emphasize the visual form of the logos, they are shown predominantly in black and white. Highlight logos are shown in colour. By sorting a vast, international array of current logotypes – ranging from those of small, design-led businesses to global brands – in this way, the book offers design consultancies a ready resource to draw upon in the research phase of identity projects. Logos are also indexed alphabetically by name of company/designer and by industrial sector, making it easy to piece together a picture of the state of the identity art in any client’s marketplace.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *